Weed Conference       https://www.weedconference.org
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Abstracts

Fred Whitford

Bio:

Frederick “Fred” Whitford, Clinical Engagement Professor, Botany and Plant Pathology and Director of Purdue Pesticide Programs. Fred received his bachelor’s degree in wildlife management from Louisiana Tech. He received his master’s and doctorate degrees in entomology from Iowa State University. He has served as the Coordinator of the Purdue Pesticide Program since 1991. Fred is the author of The Grand Old Man of Purdue University and Indiana Agriculture: A Biography of William Carroll Latta, The Queen of American Agriculture: A Biography of Virginia Claypool Meredith, and For The Good of the Farmer: A Biography of John Harrison Skinner, Dean of Purdue Agriculture as well as two other books on pesticide management. He has authored more than 300 publications and become a popular speaker with more than 5,000 presentations given throughout Indiana and the United States. In recognition of his significant contributions to Extension outreach efforts, he has received numerous awards, including the Frederick L. Hovde Award of Excellence in Educational Service to Rural People of Indiana, the Outstanding Extension Faculty/Specialist Award from Purdue Extension, and an Excellence in Extension Award from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. In addition, Fred was recently named an Honorary Master Farmer by Indiana Prairie Farmer and the Purdue University College of Agriculture.

Presentation: There’s more to measuring pesticides than you realize


Abstract:

The often-used adage, “read and follow label instructions” has new meaning. While often looking at the BIG picture in spray technology, we now realize that the subtleties of measuring the product or carrier is often neglected and may be the difference between application success and failure. A long-used measuring cup, trusting marks on tanks, failure to differentiate between liquid vs. dry ounces, and using incorrect or inaccurate measuring devices potentially lessens control of the target pest. The purpose of this talk is to urge you to investigate, and correct if necessary, this often overlooked first step in the pesticide application process.

Presentation: Cleaning right-of-way spray equipment: lessons learned from the agricultural industry


Abstract:

Crop damage can be prevented by taking the time to clean and flush the entire sprayer system—tank, hoses, screens, booms, and nozzles.  The most common mistake made is when the applicator arbitrarily decides to short-change a few of the steps in cleaning the sprayer tank, screens, hoses, and booms. Saving a few minutes by taking short cuts during the cleanout process can almost guarantee that more time will be spent in the long run resolving contamination issues. It is usually much smarter to spend the time to do it right the first time. This presentation discusses and describes the proper procedures to remove unwanted residues and prevent the unintentional introduction of herbicides to sensitive or non-labeled crops.

Presentation: Adjuvants and the power of the spray droplet 


Abstract:

Think of the pest as the bull's-eye on a target. The basic premise is that the application will get the highest scores when the right rate of the pesticide is delivered directly to the center of the bulls-eye. Not understanding the relationships between water, the leaf surface, pesticide, and poor application equipment can result in the application hitting one of the concentric circles surrounding the bulls-eye. Adjuvants can improve the biological performance of the pesticide by modifying the spray pattern, droplet, or deposit properties (spray quality) up to and including the rate of movement of the pesticide into the plant (uptake and penetration).The results of the application may be marginally acceptable, but adding the right adjuvant might have redirected the spray droplets back to the center target. Running interference for the spray droplet, adjuvants can help the spray mixture to score the winning touchdown every time.

 

Aaron Esser

Bio:

Aaron Esser is a Regional Extension Agronomist with Washington State University. His program is focused on assisting grower in the adaptation of minimum tillage and no-till systems, and more intensive crop rotations that improve overall economic profitability. His work also includes integrated weed control into crop rotations. He grew up on a farm near Genesee, Idaho, and he received his Bachelor’s Degree in agricultural economics and Masters Degree in plant science at the University of Idaho.

Presentation:  Integrated weed control in cereal grain cropping systems


Abstract:

Abstract_This presentation will focus on weed control in cereal grain systems and will incorporate alternative crops into rotation to help diversify chemistries being used to help minimize herbicide resistance. I will highlight new technologies in spring canola that will help them improve weed control in a cereal grain system. Winter canola can also be effective to help control cereal rye and other winter annual weeds that are troublesome in winter wheat cropping systems. 

Dr. Allan Felsot

Bio:

Dr. Felsot is a Professor and Extension Specialist, in Entomology and Environmental Toxicology, and serves as Graduate Coordinator for the Environmental Sciences Program at Washington State University in Richland, WA. He received his PhD from Iowa State University in 1978. Dr. Felsot has redirected his research from environmental analytical chemistry of pesticide residues during and following spraying to probabilistic risk assessment of pesticides and other chemical technologies.

Presentation: Pesticides May Be Hazardous to Bees, But Are They Also Risky?


Abstract:

Abstract It’s easy to show something is a hazard (just jiggle the conditions of the test and you’ll get what you’re looking for).  But risk is a totally different beast, yet many confuse hazard with risk.  I’ll show why pesticides, especially insecticides, are hazardous, but I’ll show why the risks of effects in the field have nary been proven.  

Greg Haubrich

Bio:

Has worked for WSDA for more than 30 years and has been the department’s noxious weed coordinator since 1989.  Graduated from Washington State University in 1983.

Presentation: Yellow Flag Iris in Washington


Abstract:

Yellow flag iris (Iris pseudacorus) continues to spread in Washington State and is currently one of the most invasive pests of the states waterways, wetlands and irrigation systems.  I’ll discuss the plants biology and dispersal, its expansion over the past several years and its current distribution and explain control options including manual, biological, cultural and chemical methods.

Tim Miller

Bio:

Tim Miller has been working for Washington State University as an extension weed scientist since 1997, and is stationed at the WSU Mount Vernon Northwestern Washington Research and Extension Center.  Tim earned his Ph.D. in plant science from the University of Idaho.  His program includes weed control research in western Washington crops, as well as studying control of non-native vegetation on agricultural, range, and forest lands.

Presentation: How Do Herbicides Actually Kill Plants?


Abstract:

Herbicides have one job and one job only:  to kill unwanted vegetation (also known as weeds).  But different herbicides work in different ways, and having a good idea of how they work can enable applicators to better use these products to control problem weed species.  In this workshop, WSU’s Tim Miller will outline how herbicides work in the plant to eventually cause treated plants to die.